The Good Friday Agreement 1998

The Good Friday Agreement 1998

On both sides of the Irish border, a referendum (similar to Brexit, but certainly not Brexit) was held to allow the people to decide whether or not they wanted the deal. The vague wording of some provisions, called “constructive ambiguities”[8], helped to secure acceptance of the agreement and postpone debate on some of the most controversial issues. These include paramilitary dismantling, police reform and the standardisation of Northern Ireland. The agreement reaffirmed its commitment to “mutual respect, civil rights and religious freedoms for all in the community.” The multi-party agreement recognised “the importance of respect, understanding and tolerance with regard to linguistic diversity”, in particular with regard to the Irish language, the Ulster Scots and the languages of other ethnic minorities in Northern Ireland, “all of which are part of the cultural richness of the island of Ireland”. The agreement called for the creation of an independent commission to audit police rules in Northern Ireland, “including ways to promote broad community support” for these agreements. The UK government has also pledged to “carry out a comprehensive review” of the criminal justice system in Northern Ireland. Political parties in Northern Ireland, which endorsed the agreement, were also invited to consider the creation of an independent advisory forum, with members of civil society with social, cultural, economic and other expertise, and appointed by both administrations. In 2002, a framework for the North-South Consultation Forum was agreed, and in 2006 the Northern Ireland Executive agreed to support its establishment. London`s direct rule ended in Northern Ireland when power officially left the new Northern Ireland Assembly, the North-South Council of Ministers and the Anglo-Irish Council, when the first regulations relating to the Anglo-Irish Agreement entered into force on 2 December 1999. [15] [16] [17] In accordance with Article 4(2) of the Anglo-Irish Agreement (Agreement between the British and Irish Governments for the implementation of the Belfast Agreement), the two governments must inform each other in writing of compliance with the conditions for the entry into force of the Anglo-Irish Agreement. entry into force should take place upon receipt of those two notifications. [18] The British government agreed to participate in a televised ceremony at Iveagh House in Dublin, the Irish Foreign Office.

Peter Mandelson, Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, took part very early on 2 December 1999. He spoke with David Andrews, the Irish Foreign Secretary. Shortly after the ceremony, at 10.30am, the Taoiseach, Bertie Ahern, signed the declaration of formal amendment to Articles 2 and 3 of the Irish Constitution. He then announced to Dáil the entry into force of the Anglo-Irish Agreement (including certain supplementary agreements to the Belfast Agreement). [7] [19] As part of the agreement, it was proposed to build on the existing Anglo-Irish interparliamentary body. Prior to the agreement, the body was composed only of parliamentarians from the British and Irish parliaments. In 2001, as proposed in the agreement, it was extended to include parliamentarians from all members of the Anglo-Irish Council. “It is for the Irish people to exercise their right to self-determination on the basis of the free and simultaneous approval of the North and the South to create a united Ireland, while accepting that this right be attained and exercised with and subject to the agreement and approval of a majority of the people of Northern Ireland.” However, the deal also came with its own wave of controversies. In Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, referendums were held on 22 May 1998. .

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